Blast

Facts | Description | Gallery Manifesto Editors | Contributors Bibliography

Blast War Number Cover. July 1915Title:
BLAST: Review of the Great English Vortex

Date of Publication:
June 20, 1914 (no. 1); July 1915 (no. 2)

Place(s) of Publication:
London, England
Toronto, Canada
New York, New York

Frequency of Publication:
Twice

Circulation:
Unknown

Physical Description:
The first issue 9″ x12″ 168 pages, pink cover with BLAST written diagonally in large black letters. It featured a Vorticist Manifesto, along with lists of BLASTS and BLESSINGS. The second issue was 112 pages and its cover featured a Vorticist sketch.

Price:
Unknown

Editor(s):
Wyndham Lewis

Associate Editor(s):
Ezra Pound (Editorial Contributor)

Publishers:
John Lane, The Bodley Head, London
John Lane Company, New York
Bell & Cockburn, Toronto

Libraries with Complete Original Issues:
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Getty Research Institute; University of California, Los Angeles; Newberry Library; University of Chicago; Northwestern University; University of Illinois; University of Michigan; Princeton University; Whitney Museum of American Art Library; Cornell University; Ohio State University; The Museum of Modern Art, New York
Searchable PDFs of full run available online at Brown University’s Modernist Journals Project.

Reprint Editions:
Santa Barbara, California: Black Sparrow, 1981. Published with Blast no. 3, a festschrift in honor of Wyndham Lewis
New York: Greenwood Reprint Co., 1968
Ann Arbor, Michigan: UMI, 2004. Little Magazines. British and European, 1910 – 1919 [Microform]

Compiled by Alex Entrekin and Alice Neumann (Class of ’06, Davidson College)

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