Inside a Room of Secret Agents at Children’s Hope Alliance

The LCSW’s (licensed clinical social workers), QP’s (qualified professionals), and LMFT’s (licensed marriage and family  therapists) are the staff members on the ground with our clients who have caused sexual harm. These TASK (Treatment Alternatives for Sexualized Kids) agents are less known to the rest of the world but celebrity to our kids and the communities impacted by their actions. They meet clients at school, over a basketball game, or with a mouthful of McDonald’s fries. Neither traffic, round-a-about Charlotte city routes, backcountry western Carolina roads, and unlisted addresses prevent them from spending time with the clients’ families. Trashcans, Jenga blocks, and snack packs are their weapons of choice to teach concepts like the difference between consent, compliance, coercion, and cooperation. TTFOFLA(two-three-four-or-five letter acronyms)is their language of choice:

TF-CBT: trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy

SA: substance abuse

CFT: child and family therapy

PCP: person-centered plan

DSS: Department of Social Services

DJJ: Department of Juvenile Justice

They encounter stories about clients stealing dirty underwear, experiencing daily emotional abuse, and getting into fights at school. And yet, our TASK staff find ways to laugh and continue to serve kids another day. As a result, our teenage clients and their families trust the agents who jump right into the mess of their real lives. In the short few months since joining the TASK and CHA (Children’s Hope Alliance) team, this physics major has watched people bring hope to hurting children and families when the world can’t always be explained with formulas and algorithms.

An update on our project

The TASK team has been working hard to establish a manual that reflects the diverse experiences of our staff from Charlotte to Guilford. Staffing and time with the kids allow us to watch the TASK model in action. Data collection is underway as we determine what TASK elements are most effective and efficient in bringing change to the lives of our clients’ and families. We are developing research procedures and structures to produce relevant and rigorous results. Those will be presented to our field and related subfields which include child psychology, sexual abuse, trauma care, child development, and juvenile delinquency.  The more research we do, the more excited we are about TASK and its potential to reach others who have caused sexual harm.

The Carolina Thread Trail: A Collection of Unfinished Thoughts

On my desk, there are at least four scrapped, partially written blog posts. Sentences scratched out, pictures scribbled on, quotes highlighted, bullet points listed. None of these drafts have made it past my legal pad (sorry Jeff) because I felt that they either didn’t properly describe my experiences, focused too much on one aspect, or [...]

Continue reading...

Ramblings on a day’s work as Program Analyst for Touch Foundation in Tanzania

I show up to work at 8:45 or 9:15, never 9:00 am. This is not company policy of course but rather what seems to be my keen unpunctuality; something ingrained in my character during 4 years of Davidson where “international students arrive to class late”. In 2001, the USAID head of the time proclaimed that [...]

Continue reading...

Adversity Against Adversity

When I walked through the doors of the Education building at MAHEC, I wasn’t sure what to expect. I had never done an employee orientation of any kind before. ‘It’ll just be an extended series of PowerPoint presentations… right?’ Well, little did I know that said presentations would have such a great impact on my [...]

Continue reading...

What does it mean to be a Davidson Impact Fellow?

“So what exactly do you do?” When I first started here at OrthoCarolina (OC) I struggled to answer this question when my friends or even coworkers would ask. As a collective, the Davidson Impact Fellows share similar values and sometimes even the same goals, but individually, our job descriptions differ greatly. I found that each [...]

Continue reading...

Justice is not so simply dealt out: walking with kids who cause sexual harm

My name is Grace Watt. As I transition into my new job, which I will describe later, I have had to ask some complicated and emotionally distressing questions.  The following essay is part of an ongoing, maturing conversation with myself as I process what I am learning and how I might more effectively respond to the issue [...]

Continue reading...

Taking the Time to Reflect

DHC 4C Logo Blue Text

I just passed the halfway mark for my fellowship in June. This seemed momentous for several reasons: a) This is my first “real job,” thus I feel like a real adult with one work anniversary under my belt, b) I have less than a year to figure out my next steps, which still seem pretty [...]

Continue reading...

Quis custodiet ipsos excelum

I’m trying to navigate through the bureaucracy of obtaining a work permit with an immigration officer, and my progress is interrupted by the officer’s ringtone. It reminds me of the ringtone I had on the phone I was given during my semester in Uganda almost a year ago. Moments later, someone else’s cell phone brings [...]

Continue reading...

Expecting the Unexpected

“Compassion is the sometimes fatal capacity for feeling what it is like to live inside somebody else’s skin. It’s the knowledge that there can never really be any peace and joy for me until there is peace and joy for you too.” – Frederick Buechner At some point during each of the six audit projects [...]

Continue reading...

Preparedness

The recent months have been a whirlwind. With changing seasons, new jobs, and big hopes, I concluded my Davidson Impact Fellowship and embarked on a new journey. I have yet to have time to sit and think about the things I worked on and contributed to over the past year. So as I pause to [...]

Continue reading...