“A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words”

My Book of Hours

My Book of Hours

“A Picture is worth a thousand words.” We’ve all heard that phrase, and a book in the Rare Book Room collection proves that many pictures are worth more than that.
My Book of Hours: 167 designs engraved on wood by Frans Masereel. Foreward by Romain Rolland. Se trouve chez l’Auteur, 1922, is a book totally “written” in pictures…wood engravings designed and executed by Frans Masereel, a Belgian printmaker, illustrator, draughtsman, and painter. It was self-published in an edition strictly limited to 600 copies for America, each signed by Masereel.

Limited edition note

Limited edition note

Rolland Romain, in his forward to the book writes:

“[Masereel] has produced a sort of philosophic and fantastic travesty poems in pictures, of which My Book of Hours is one of the most beautiful examples. This is the story of a man who has drunk steadily of all the springs of life. He has known all its joys; all its illusions, all its disappointments. Exhausted by disillusionment, he whips with his contemptuous laughter this humankind which he had loved so well, and fleeing from it, he goes to search in the wilderness, to become lost there, for the peace of Nature and of Death who inevitably crushes in her fangs the vanity of life….
May this Book of Hours carry to America the name and fame of Frans Masereel!”

My Book of Hours: 167 designs engraved on wood by Frans Masereel. 1922. Our copy is number 34 of a limited edition of 600.

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Bob McKillop Throughout the Years

This Friday, Davidson’s men’s basketball team will play University of Iowa, kicking off their eighth NCAA tournament under head coach Bob McKillop. McKillop’s 26th year as head coach is also Davidson’s first in the Atlantic 10 Conference, so to honor both a successful first year in a new conference and his long tenure at Davidson, the Archives & Special Collections presents pictures of Bob McKillop throughout the years:

Many forget that Bob McKillop originally came to Davidson as an assistant coach for the 1978 - 1979 season.

Many forget that Bob McKillop originally came to Davidson as an assistant coach for the 1978 – 1979 season.

The team photo from the 1978 - 1979 Wildcats - McKillop is on the far left.

The team photo from the 1978 – 1979 Wildcats – McKillop is on the far left.

McKillop returned to Davidson as the head coach for the 1989 - 1990 season (from that year's basketball media guide).

McKillop returned to Davidson as the head coach for the 1989 – 1990 season (from that year’s basketball media guide).

Part of the head coach gig in small town Davidson includes posing for photos with team sponsors - as McKillop does here with Robert Cashion of Cashion's deli, for the 1991 - 1992 media guide.

Part of the head coach gig at Davidson includes posing for photos with team sponsors – as McKillop does here with Robert Cashion of Cashion’s deli, for the 1991 – 1992 media guide.

... and also here, with Jeff Shoe of Mooresville Ford-Mercury, for the 1992 - 1993 media guide.

… and also here, with Jeff Shoe of Mooresville Ford-Mercury, for the 1992 – 1993 media guide.

1992 - 1993 men's basketball team photo - McKillop is standing on the far right.

1992 – 1993 men’s basketball team photo – McKillop is standing on the far right.

McKillop on the cover of the 1998 - 1999 men's basketball game day program.

McKillop on the cover of the 1998 – 1999 men’s basketball game day program.

McKillop courtside, during the 1999 - 2000 season.

McKillop courtside, during the 1999 – 2000 season.

... and again, on the cover of the 2000 - 2001 men's basketball media guide.

McKillop on the cover of the 2000 – 2001 men’s basketball media guide.

The men's basketball team photo for 2006 - 2007 - McKillop is in the center of the back row.

The men’s basketball team photo for 2006 – 2007 – McKillop is in the center of the back row. Current NBA player Steph Curry is seated second from the left, front row.

A more casual McKillop on the court with the USA U18 team, whom he coached to a silver medal in the 2008 FIBA Americas Championship.

A more casual McKillop on the court with the USA U18 team, whom he coached to a silver medal in the 2008 FIBA Americas Championship.

The cover of the 2008 - 2009 basketball media guide, taken in E.H. Little's own Smith Rare Book Room. McKillop is pictured with a few of his SoCon tournament trophies and with then-seniors Andrew Lovedale, Can Civi, and Max Paulhus Gosselin.

The cover of the 2008 – 2009 basketball media guide, taken in E.H. Little’s own Smith Rare Book Room. McKillop is pictured with a few of his SoCon tournament trophies and with then-seniors Andrew Lovedale, Can Civi, and Max Paulhus Gosselin.

McKillop on the court with players, from the 2009 - 2010 media guide.

McKillop on the court with players, from the 2009 – 2010 media guide.

In honor of McKillop's 25th year at Davidson, the basketball court became McKillop Court (from the February 5th, 2014 issue of The Davidsonian).

In honor of McKillop’s 25th year at Davidson, the basketball court became McKillop Court (from the February 5th, 2014 issue of The Davidsonian).

We hope you enjoyed this small sample of archival holdings on Bob McKillop’s years at Davidson – go Wildcats!

Welcome themes

Spring is not quite here – the dogwoods are not yet in bloom – but crowds of high school students with parents in tow (or is it parents with students in tow?) are surging across campus and checking out the town.  The ritual of college visits brings to mind the parallel history of college brochures and raises the questions, “how has Davidson College described itself over the years?  And how has the town promoted itself?”

Davidson brochure circa 1956

Davidson brochure circa 1956

On a 1956 brochure, images of Chambers, the Union, and Johnston Gym ran counterpoint to the question HAVE YOU CHOSEN YOUR CAREER?  The tone is serious, “Because a college education today is so important, you must consider carefully every opportunity that exists for you in higher education before deciding what you will do in four years of undergraduate work and where you will take that work.”  But for those who have not chosen a career some reassurance is given:

Many students who enroll at Davidson are undecided about their careers. . . . Each student is helped to find the field in which he can attain the highest degree of happiness and success, to fulfill his potential as a a citizen.

1959 brochure

1959 brochure

A few years later, the text remains very similar (the first sentence is identical) but the graphics have gotten larger and the emphasis on careers shifted somewhat:

The Davidson educational program seeks to prepare men not simply for making a living but for living lives of service as responsible citizens and leaders in the community, the state, and the nation.

Color comes to the 1966 brochure

Color comes to the 1966 brochure

By 1966, the college added color and changed the focus a bit. Starting with a bit of college history, the brochure promotes Davidson as a “particular kind of college.”  Specifically:

a small residential college for men, priding itself on the personal relationship between students and faculty. Its educational program is grounded in a sound liberal arts curriculum and a devotion on the part of its faculty, to the primary task of teaching undergraduates. A deeply rooted student government tradition is based on a concept of individual honor as old as the college itself.

The Davidson scene in 1969

The Davidson scene in 1969

Less color but more pictures in 1969 with captions including:

On the beautiful front campus, Dr. Mahoney’s class successfully combines learning with informality;
In Wednesday evening “Open End Discussions” students exchange ideas with faculty members on topics from politics to Davidson’s new curriculum;
The campus takes on a “new look” when the students invite more than 700 dates from nearby women’s colleges to the campus for dance weekends.

1974 booklet

1974 booklet

This 1974 brochure answered the question “Why choose Davidson?” by noting that

– We have a first quality academic program (stating bluntly – Our academic program is not just good. It is one of the best in the country.)
– You can learn many different ways (assuring students that at the heart of academics at Davidson are shared learning experiences between able professors and able students).
– People at Davidson care about other people (This is no accident. We select students how have shown a concern for others.)
– We’re in the country (just outside a city)
– We play big-time basketball

Davidson graphics 1985-style

Davidson graphics 1985-style

Inside the 1985 brochure

Inside the 1985 brochure

The town of Davidson was looking back more than the college. No technology highlights in a 1987 brochure. Instead it notes that the Davidson Dry Goods (now Toast) still has the original tin molding on the ceiling and the Natural Resources building (now home to Summit Coffee) served “as the town police station with an upstairs morgue.”

1987 town brochure & shopping guide

1987 town brochure & shopping guide

A decade later, Davidson was highlighting its selectivity, educational program, Rhodes Scholars, and faculty along with a claim that “Davidson is a leader among liberal arts colleges in integrating technology into the liberal arts.”

1991 brochure

1991 brochure

The college’s 1991 brochure returned to the question Why Davidson? The answers include:

– As a Davidson student, you will learn to think broadly and deeply
– Davidson focuses on the individual
– Students at Davidson are bright, talented, and highly motivated

The town brochure for the same year still focused on the historic for its “three block stretch of early 20th century buildings where you’ll find a wonderful assortment of unusual stores” (no mention of morgues).

2011 Brochure

2011 Brochure

2011 echoed 1969 prominently featuring informal learning outside but the text talks to a new generation – “you are searching for a college, the right intersection between who you are now and who you hope to become” –  and also encourages them to go online.

The town also did a bit of updating – going with a new slogan “Hip and Historic.”

Town brochure for a new generation

Town brochure for a new generation

And expanding from just Main Street to South Main and Exit 30.

Town brochure moving beyond Main Street

Town brochure moving beyond Main Street

The 2013 college brochure goes even farther in the 21st century using a hashtag graphic to place Davidson in the digital world.

2013 brochure

2013 brochure

 

Ice Box Pudding #1

Inspired by our archival colleagues at Duke University Libraries’ Rubenstein Library Test Kitchen blog series (among other delicious historic cooking blogs, such as Cooking in the Archives), the Archives & Special Collections team decided to try our hand(s) at making (and eating) some of the recipes we have in our collections.

For our first recipe, I picked Misses Sadie and Minnie Scofield’s “Ice Box Pudding #1,” from The Davidson Cook Book compiled for the Davidson Civic Club circa 1928 (the same cookbook that includes a recipe for “Roasting a Husband”). The title page states that “The object of this book is to assist the good housewives to preserve, to the future generation, the many excellent and matchless recipes of the Davidson ladies.”

I’ll admit it – I wanted to try an easier recipe for this first go, which is part of the appeal of Ice Box Pudding. Another appeal was digging into the Misses Scofield, who appear to have been citizens of some note in the Davidson community of the late 1800s and early 1900s.

Miss Minnie and Miss Sadie Scofield, circa 1890s.

Miss Minnie and Miss Sadie Scofield, circa 1890s.

John N. Scofield, the grandfather of Sadie (1873-1956) and Minnie (1878-1958), came to Davidson in 1857 as the contractor for the first Chambers Building (Old Chambers). Their grandmother ran a boardinghouse in town beginning in the late 1860s; her most famous boarder was Woodrow Wilson. Minnie and Sadie’s father, Stephen Charles “Skit” Scofield ran a popular store on the corner of Main and Depot streets, which the family home was attached to. After “Mr. Skit’s” death in 1917, the Misses Scofield opened a tea-room in the storefront.

The Scofield family in front of their home.

The Scofield family in front of their home, when Minnie and Sadie were younger (including family dog, “the fat boy”).

Mary Beaty’s Davidson: A History of the Town from 1835 until 1937 includes this colorful description of Minnie and Sadie Scofield: “They were wonderful cooks. Generations of students waxed fat at their tea room… In their later years they often sat in the empty store building, enjoying the unparalleled view its windows gave them of Davidson life as it passed by from any of four directions. They would rock and fan and comment on passerby (Miss Sadie sweetly, Miss Minnie venomously), and what they did not know about the town was not worth knowing. They and their home were institutions, a link with the Davidson now a century in the past.”

Another Scofield family picture, this time showing the storefront.

Another Scofield family picture, this time showing the storefront. The store and house were demolished in 1960.

I’ll fully admit that I’m not a very experienced cook, but I actually thought that the Scofields’ recipe for Ice Box Pudding was easy to follow and barely took any time at all!

Ice Box Pudding #1, as published in 1928.

Ice Box Pudding #1, as published in 1928.

I wasn’t sure how much a “cake” of bakers chocolate actually is, so I estimated that it was roughly a full-sized bar but bought extra chocolate just in case – one milk and one dark chocolate (Ghirardelli). I ended up using both, and doubling the rest of the ingredients, because I wasn’t sure if I was making enough pudding to fully cover the ladyfingers. I also added a splash of milk and a half pat of butter partway through the melting process, to thin out the chocolate mixture a bit while keeping it creamy. This resulted in what is probably a thicker pudding layer than the Scofield sisters would have turned out (although I didn’t hear any complaints from my coworkers after their taste-test!). Store-bought ladyfingers (Forno Bonomi) make up the base, and I put the pudding in the freezer for 12 hours instead of the fridge for 24. While this did stray from the historical recipe a bit, hopefully it remained close enough to the spirit of the 1928 Ice Box Pudding.

The final product! Before putting the pudding in the freezer (left), and after some of the E.H. Little Library and Center for Teaching and Learning staff got to it.

The final product! Before putting the pudding in the freezer (left), and after some of the E.H. Little Library and Center for Teaching and Learning staff got to it (right).

Overall, our first foray into archival cooking was a success – I’m excited to try out more (and possibly more complicated) recipes in the months to come!

Black History Month at Davidson

As February draws to a close (and we hope takes all ice and snow with it), we mark the end of another Black History Month at Davidson. The origins of Black History Month are found in the creation of a Negro history week in 1926 by the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History. Celebrated in February, it provided the impetus during the Civil Rights era of the 1960s and 1970s to promote a Black History Month. President Gerald Ford officially declared the first national Black History Month in 1976.

Davidson was slightly behind the times but making an effort. Members of the Black Student Coalition invited faculty to participate in Davidson’s first Black Week in April 1976.

BSC letter announcing the1976 Black Week.

BSC letter announcing the1976 Black Week.

February 8, 1980 letter to editor on Black History Month

February 8, 1980 letter to editor on Black History Month

In 1980, the BSC used the Davidsonian to invite students to join in Black History Month activities. This letter begins by acknowledging campus misconceptions, including that the BSC is “not a budding Black Panther Party,” or just a “social club of blacks.”  It concludes by quoting the coalition’s constitution,  “We the black students of Davidson do establish this kindred to preserve the pride and dignity of the students who have gone on before us, as well as those who will follow after us. With the foundation of a strong liberal arts education, we seek to insure that our cultural heritage is remembered, preserved, and maintained as long as this kindred exists.”

March 13, 1981 editorialThe following year, the chair of BSC’s Special Events Committe wrote an editorial encouraging more participation in Black History Month events noting that

“this year’s programs were most strikingly marked not by the enthusiasm with which Coalition members prepared the programs, nor by the unquestionable benefits to be gained from consideration of the viewpoints expressed, but regrettably by the dismally low attendance of the events by the Davidson student body.”

In 1988, Muadi Mukenge took the opportunity to pen an editorial on the importance of black history, while the calendar listings in the Davidsonian  remained silent on any special activities related to black history.

By 1989, the Dean of Student’s Office joined with the BSC in organizing events for the Black History Month Cultural Arts Series. Speakers that year included Dr. C. Eric Lincoln and Dr. Henry Louis Gates.

Program of events for 1988 Black History Month at Davidson

Program of events for 1988 Black History Month at Davidson

The cultural art series continued into the 1990s featuring alumni speakers, art and dance exhibitions, cooking workshops, and films.

1991 schedule

1991 schedule

1993 schedule

1993 schedule

Cover of 1996 series schedule

Cover of 1996 series schedule

In recent years, the cultural arts series name has faded but the graphics have gotten better. More importantly, more groups on campus have joined in sponsoring the even, including other student groups (OLAS, the Organization of Latin American Studies), centers (Civic Engagement and Vann Ethics) and academic departments (History, German, Film and Media Studies, Education).

2010 calendar with events co-sponsored by OLAS and Dean Rusk

2010 calendar with events co-sponsored by OLAS and Dean Rusk

2013 poster with event cosponsored by Film and Media Studies and Civic Engagement

2013 poster with event cosponsored by Film and Media Studies and Civic Engagement

2013 event with 9 other groups joining the BSC

2013 event with 9 other groups joining the BSC