Delightes for Ladies – Part 2

Sweet Cakes

Sweet Cakes

Delightes for Ladies continues to intrigue me, so I took some more time to look at some of the recipes, thinking that it would be fun to try to re-create some of them.
As I indicated in my first post, the spelling was inconsistent and instructions were often cryptic to me, so I looked at several recipes. Sweet Cakes without either spice or sugar asked the cook to “wash your Parsneps cleane” and “dry them upon Canuas,” and since I had neither “parsneps” nor “canuas” I scratched that recipe. I looked next at directions To candy Orenge pills.

To candy Orenge pills

To candy Orenge pills

Those instructions indicated that I should take the “orenge pills” and “take fine Sugar and Rosewater, & boyle it to the height of Menus Christi.” I figured out that I needed orange peel, but without Rosewater and having no idea how high Menus Christi is, I eliminated that recipe, too. There were many more recipes from which to choose, though, so I persevered.
The next recipe I looked at was

To make gelly of Straw-berries

To make gelly of Straw-berries

To make gelly of Straw-berries, Mulberies, Raspberries, or any such tender fruit. Maybe this one would work. I could certainly find strawberries. But, when I saw that I would need to “grinde them in an Alabaster Mortar,” that I needed “faire water” and that I needed to boil the mixture in a “posnet” with a “little peece of Isinglasse” I gave up on that one, too. Next, To make Ginger-bread.

To make Ginger-bread

To make Ginger-bread

Ok, everyone likes gingerbread, so maybe I’d found my recipe. But the first sentence proved otherwise. “Take three stale Manchets and grate them.” To make gingerbread? Another recipe down the tubes. I found another one which sounded promising.

To make puffe-paste

To make puffe-paste

To make puffe-paste needed “a quart of the finest flower,” “the whites of three egges, and the yolks of two, & a little cold water.” Now this was promising. But, then I read that I would need to “driue it with a rowling pin abroad,” “put on small peeces of butter” and “fold it ouer.” Not once, but ten times. So, out went that recipe, too.
But, I finally found one! The title was simple, To make wafers.

To make wafers

To make wafers

The ingredients included “a pint of flower,” “a little creame with two yolkes of egs,” and “a little searced Cinamon & sugar.” All that was necessary was to “worke them all together, and bake the paste upon hot Irons.” Hurrah! I recognized this one. Wafers are our cookies, and these are our “Snickerdoodles.” Fun for the weekend. Making Snickerdoodles!

“Delightes for Ladies”

Delightes for LadiesI love looking at the old “housekeeping hints” kinds of books…those which offer advice on cooking, cleaning, household remedies, beauty tips for ladies, etc. I found a wonderful one in the Rare Book Room the other day, Delightes for Ladies. It was a gift of the Reverend Samuel M. Lindsey, and is a reprint of a 1609 London publication originally written by Sir Hugh Plat. Plat was not only a writer of “household hints,” but is also credited with several inventions including a finger ring for gamblers with a reflecting disk for “seeing” the opponents cards, secret inks and a unique method of penmanship, and alphabet blocks…a fundamental in all children’s nurseries.
The book was fun to read, although a bit difficult, since the spelling was inconsistent and references within the “recipes” were often cryptic to me. As the introduction to the reprint notes:

…when Delightes for Ladies was printed our language was still in the developing stage. There were few fixed and firm rules. A word lent itself to more than one way of spelling and any might be correct, for at that time there was no consistency in spelling… The letters “u” and “v” were used interchangeably, and so were “u” and “w.”…. Capitals were used at random, no fixed rule governed them. Ofttimes where a word ended in “e,” a letter was dropped and sometimes an extra “e” was added.

The text included a section on Secrets in Distillation; Sweete Powders, Oyntments, Beauties, &c; The Arte of Preseruing; and Cookerie and Huswiferie. The reprint volume also included a glossary for those of us who aren’t as familiar with the terms used in 1609!
Take a look at some of the suggestions for making “prince-bisket,” for “skin kept white and cleere,” “to souse a young Pig,” and to “make true spirit of wine.” If you can’t get to the beautician and your hair color needs attention, you can also find directions on “how to colour the head or beard into a Chestnut colour in half an houre.” Of course this last set of directions assumes that you’ll be glad to put lead, sulphur and quicklime on your hair!

Secrets in Distillation

Secrets in Distillation

Sweet Powders

Sweet Powders

Prince-bisket

Prince-bisket

To Souse a young Pig

To Souse a young Pig

Glossary

Glossary

How to colour the head

How to colour the head

Religious Satire – Davidson Style

The ability to laugh at ourselves is a gift. The work of political and satirical cartoons is to make us think, to see another perspective and to challenge the practice of taking anything too seriously.

Around the D joins in the international proclaims of “Je suis Charlie” this week with a look at student cartoons around the topic of religion at Davidson.

From 30 October 1953 poking fun at students inattention during Chapel.

From 30 October 1953 poking fun at students inattention during Chapel.

The earliest cartoon found comes from 1953. The caption reads “In Davidson Everybody Reads the Davidsonian” and depicts students ignoring a Chapel speaker by reading the paper.  Sixteen years later, student efforts to avoid chapel still inspired the Davidsonian cartoonists.

From 7 February 1969,  mocking both exam season and student tricks to avoid chapel.

From 7 February 1969, mocking both exam season and student tricks to avoid chapel.

In 1960, segregation was a hot topic at Davidson with students still deeply divided.  This cartoon plays on the college’s Presbyterian heritage and the 10 commandments adding an 11th commandment Thou shalt love thy white neighbor as thyself.

From 16 February 1960 protesting segregation.

From 16 February 1960 protesting segregation.

From 8 April 1960 juxtaposing Davidson College Presbyterian Church and a favorite local bar

From 8 April 1960 juxtaposing Davidson College Presbyterian Church and a favorite local bar

This cartoon plays with student love of beer (Our Lady of Milwalkee) and their dislike of regular church attendance.

Student apathy, whether towards church and chapel services or involvement in the religious service activities of the YMCA was a popular theme.

From 10 November 1961 showing a student taking rather than leaving shoes for a YMCA drive

From 10 November 1961 showing a student taking rather than leaving shoes for a YMCA drive

From 19 October 1962 with more direct criticism of student apathy

From 19 October 1962 with more direct criticism of student apathy

From 7 December 1962 satirizing student preference for holiday parties over charity

From 7 December 1962 satirizing student preference for holiday parties over charity

College policies, particularly around the practices of religious requirements for faculty and faculty oaths, became a re-occurring theme.

From 17 October 1958, this cartoon accompanied an editorial on the required faculty oath.

From 17 October 1958, this cartoon accompanied an editorial on the required faculty oath.

From 23 October 1964, the ball and chain motif reappears, this time hampering new faculty from applying to Davidson

From 23 October 1964, the ball and chain motif reappears, this time hampering new faculty from applying to Davidson

From 20 November 1964, criticizing the Board of Trustees for focusing on faculty oaths instead of campus reforms.

From 20 November 1964, criticizing the Board of Trustees for focusing on faculty oaths instead of campus reforms.

From 20 April 1977, during the Linden controversy

From 20 April 1977, during the Linden controversy

The Cuban crisis in 1962 inspired a cartoon about religious blockades at Davidson.

From 26 October 1962 showing a Cuba-shaped Davidson College caught between tradition and new vesper policies

From 26 October 1962 showing a Cuba-shaped Davidson College caught between tradition and new vesper policies

The appearance of an atheist speaker on campus in 1964 brought a bit of dinosaur humor to the editorial page.

From 14 February 1964, cartoon and headline from editorial

From 14 February 1964, cartoon and headline from editorial

Questions of war and peace arose in 1963 and 1967.

From 18 October 1963, peace message not being well-received by students

From 18 October 1963, peace message not being well-received by students

From 29 September 1967, using a quotation from the college catalog to raise issues of faith and war

From 29 September 1967, using a quotation from the college catalog to raise issues of faith and war

In 1984, a student group, the Davidson Christian Fellowship held a mock funeral on campus. The Davidsonian article reporting on the funeral and the demise of DCF begins:

DCF is dead,”declared Davidson Christian Fellowship President Frank Ivey. In a dramatic ceremony at Coffee and Cokes last Wednesday in front of Chambers, several DCF members dressed in sombre clothes, and bearing a coffin, pronounced the organization’s demise. This means that there will be no more large group meetings.  The Fellowship ceases to exist. Spokesmen Craig Detweiler and Ivey explained that DCF had failed in its mission to meet the needs of Davidson students. They criticized themselves and DCF for misrepresenting the true nature of Christianity.
While the DCF members took their decision seriously, the cartoonist in the same issie offered a lighter perspective.
From 20 April 1984,  with St. Peter questioning self-martyrdom

From 20 April 1984, with St. Peter questioning self-martyrdom

Here are a few more editorial efforts:

Kissing the Mystic Scarab: the Blue Pencil Chapter of Sigma Upsilon

Nearly 100 years ago, on January 18th, 1915, Davidson College’s fledgling Blue Pencil Club turned into the Blue Pencil Chapter of Sigma Upsilon, a Southern literary honor society. The seven founding members included five of the founding Davidsonian editors (Francis Wilson Price, William Andrew McIlwaine, George Warren Gignilliat, James Enoch Faw, and John Payne Williams), as well as the Poet for the Class of 1915 (John William Stuart Gilchrist), and the editor-in-chief of The Davidson College Magazine (Uhlman Seymour Alexander).

The founding members of the Blue Pencil Chapter of Sigma Upsilon, including

The founding members of the Blue Pencil Chapter of Sigma Upsilon, including faculty members elected during the first meeting in January 1915: Dr. Sentelle (Class of 1894, Professor of Religion and Philosophy, later Dean of Students), Dr. Fulton (Professor of English), and Dr. McConnell (Class of 1899, Professor of History, Economics, Mathematics, and Latin, later Dean of Faculty).

The founders stated that “the object of the club shall be to promote more effective literary work among the students” of Davidson, and that membership would be “based upon literary ability in it’s broadest sense.” The members also voted to publicize the organization in The Davidsonian, and at a meeting the next month, voted that members be required to produce two papers per year for the Blue Pencil Club for possible future publication, in addition to leading literary discussions.

The minutes from March 8th, 1916, provide insight into what a typical meeting in these early days was like: after a vote on new members, “a Motion to admit women into the Club was unanimously voted down,” the Blue Pencils decided to pay $15 to get a club picture in Quips and Cranks, and “the new members each read a two minute quotation from some Shakespearian [sic] character in costume… They then took initiation ceremony and the social side of the club received emphasis.” Meetings frequently featured “stunts” (such as new initiates having to compose and read aloud essays on the subjects of “Is it a Submarine? If so, Why?” and “‘A game of golf as played on a bird propelled ocean liner,’ with all of the details, and he was arrayed in the costume of a count of the time of Elizabeth.”), burlesques of the faculty, and pastiches and parodies of famous authors.

A page from Hugh C. Hamilton's (Class of 1920) scrapbook, showing individual member's photographs grouped in front of the Sigma Upsilon seal.

A page from Hugh C. Hamilton’s (Class of 1920) album, showing members grouped in front of the Sigma Upsilon seal.

The Blue Pencil Chapter continued its reputation for japes and prolific writing until its dissolution in 1970. William C. Doub Kerr (Class of 1915) established the Woodrow Wilson Creative Research Award and Willa Cather Creative Writing Award for members of Sigma Upsilon in 1937, and wrote to Cather that year, as Jan Blodgett wrote here on Around the D back in 2009.

Willa Cather's note

Willa Cather’s note reads: “My Dear Mr. Kerr; Thank you most for your friendly letter. But, honestly, I think the “new sails” have a better chance of making port when they are not taught “creative writing.” It can’t be taught, for one thing!*
Sincerely yours,
Willa Cather.
* Perhaps it can be guided a little, modestly? I don’t like to be too sure.”

The late 1930s were a busy time for Sigma Upsilon – the chapter members collaboratively wrote “A College Novel” between 1937 and 1939, including this prologue by Chalmers Gaston Davidson, both a student and later faculty member of the Blue Pencil Chapter:

....

Dr. Davidson (Class of 1928, Professor of History, and Directory of the Library) was not shamed in the minutes of a November 1936 meeting, unlike his fellow faculty members of Blue Pencil, when Dr. Erwin (Class of 1906, Professor of English) and Dr. Cumming (Class of 1921, Professor of English), who “were caught red-handed with two ice-creams.”

While early initiations seemed to be chapter-specific, by the 1930’s Sigma Upsilon seems to have established organization-wide protocols. Davidson’s chapter added to the official Sigma Upsilon initiation ceremony, however, as these handwritten notes circa the 1930s illustrate:

circa 1939

“In order to indicate your submission to the noble ideas of this fraternity to which you have pledged your allegiance. you will kneed before the mystic scarab and bestow upon it the symbolic kiss of fealty.”

Notable Davidson alumni who kissed the mystic scarab include: Sam Spencer (Class of 1940, President of Davidson College 1968 – 1983), Jason McManus (Class of 1956, former Editor-in-Chief of Time Inc.), and Charles Wright (Class of 1957, U.S. Poet Laureate), and many English and History professors had been inducted as faculty members. In the course of going through our archival collections on the Blue Pencil Club/ Chapter, I discovered so many former members who went on to teach here at Davidson or other academic institutions – who else have we missed that enjoyed ice creams and secret initiations?

Davidson Resolutions

Happy New Year from Around the D!

In case you are having trouble coming up with appropriate resolutions for 2015, here’s a look at some resolutions from New Years past:

In 1922, students were encouraged to attend the YMCA Sunday evening meetings. Noting that these meetings were “the only religious meeting at Davidson which the student body can claim as distinctively its own,” the Davidsonian editors rued that “attendance is not what it should be.” For those editors, it was not enough that half to two-thirds of the student body was now attending. They asked that every student (all 512 enrolled in 1922) to “resolve to become a regular attender.”

January 13, 1922 Davidsonian editoral "New Year Resolutions"

January 13, 1922 Davidsonian editoral “New Year Resolutions”

Being a better student has been a popular them – appearing in editorials in 1927, 1955, 1960, and 2011. Taking a very serious tone, the 1927 editors declared, ” To everyone the New Year holds out a challenge, but this challenge is particularly directed at college students, the men and women who are preparing themselves for the great job of making the world fit during the next generation.” They encouraged students to consider the question, “Why are you in college?” and how well their time is being used.

January 13, 1927 Davidsonian editorial challenging students to reflect on why they are in college.

January 13, 1927 Davidsonian editorial challenging students to reflect on why they are in college.

Gilbert Gragg, class of 1955

Gilbert Gragg, class of 1955

Gilbert Gragg took a satirical approach in 1955 creating a list of resolutions that included:

I resolve to continue taking every cut allowed me.

I resolve never to been on campus after noon on Saturday and before seven on Sunday.

I resolve to not participate in UCM or attend any of the Artist Series, as I may be stimulated and challenged.

I resolve to be as critical as possible of every aspect of Davidson life to show my maturity and independence.

January 14, 1955 Davidsonian article by Gilbert Gragg

January 14, 1955 Davidsonian article by Gilbert Gragg.

The writer of the 1960 editorial focused on organizations more than individuals finding that student organizations needed to be more focused, the Interfraternity Council was making “little effort to integrate their work with the educational aims of the college,” the YMCA leadership lacked a clear vision, the Student Council and Davidsonian were deemed below par, and the campus had “little basic criticism and debate, and even less encouragement of them.” He did have kinder words for the International Relations Club for their promotion of African issues and the denominational fellowships for deepening their activities.

One question remains -who is the Robinson offering this critique?

January 8, 1960 New Year's resolutions editorial

January 8, 1960 New Year’s resolutions editorial

In 2011 the focus shifted from campus life to wellness, with writer Jaqui Logan offering gentle tips for healthy resolutions.

January 19, 2011 resolution advice article

January 19, 2011 resolution advice article

Paul Alderman, class of 1931

Paul Alderman, class of 1931

On a few occasions, the sports page writers claimed the resolution making. In 1930, P. R. Alderman sought to improve Davidson athletic future by having students join in recruiting efforts. While acknowledging that “No one can truthfully say that Davidson is a losing college as far as athletics are concerned,” he also argued that “at the same time it is fighting against great odds, just as other comparatively small schools are.” His New Year’s suggestion was for students to “write or speak to a friend who has made good in athletics in high school” and encourage them to come to Davidson.

January 16, 1930 article by Paul Alderman

January 16, 1930 article by Paul Alderman

Will Bryan and Suzy Eckl took a wider approach in 2007 encouraging their fellow students to: get interactive, spend time with friends, save money, be kind to your neighbor, get in shape, honor thy elders and learn something new – all with a sports twist. Spending time with friends meant waiting in line together to pick up basketball tickets, saving money happened by attending more sports events (since they are free to students), and honor thy elders meant celebrating Bob McKillop’s 300th win and pushing for the basketball court to named for him (finally happened in 2014!)

January 24, 2007 Davidsonian sports resolutions

January 24, 2007 Davidsonian sports resolutions

And finally, what would resolutions be without at least one humor column? in 1963, Dave Pusey reported statements submitted to the fictional Faculty Committee on New Year’s and Hannukah Resolutions. These included competing demands from benefactors Charles Dana and the Belk Family with Dana demanding Belk dorm be renamed for him and the Belks demanding that the (then) new science building be renamed for them.

Henry Lilly, beloved English professor or snarling gambler?

Henry Lilly, beloved English professor or snarling gambler?

English professor Henry Lilly announced that he was “sick of being a kindly old gent type, and will revert to my secret desire of being a professional gambler, complete with snarl, eyeshades, and brocaded vest.

Dorm mother Mrs. J. B. Moore declared her intention of selling all the  pin-ups she’s confiscated for a college fund and music professor and choir director Don Plott announced his ambition to get the Male Chorus on TV by including “in its repertoire for the coming year numerous Ferlin Huskey songs and a trained chimp act.”

For more fun, click on the article below:

January 11, 1963 tongue-in-cheek resolutions

January 11, 1963 tongue-in-cheek resolutions

What ever your resolutions are for 2015, Around the D hopes following us will be one of them!

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