A (Brief) History of THATCamp Piedmont

This Saturday, October 18th, Davidson will play host to the third THATCamp Piedmont. THATCamp, short for The Humanities And Technology Camp, “is an open, inexpensive meeting where humanists and technologists of all skill levels learn and build together in sessions proposed on the spot,” according to the official website. The first THATCamp was held at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University in 2008. THATCamps are often organized either around a theme or geographic location, and provide a space for learning, sharing, and collaboration across a range of disciplines and specialties.

cropped-THATcamp-logo21

 

THATCamp Piedmont was first held in 2012, at Davidson College, and again in 2013 at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.  You can read reactions and reflections related to the events by Roger Whitson, Donna Lanclos, Barry Peddycord, and Davidson’s own Mark Sample.

This year’s THATCamp sessions will be split between E.H. Little Library and the Knobloch Campus Center, with the day’s activities starting at 8:00 AM with breakfast and registration, and wrapping up at 4:30 PM with post-THATCamp drinks and conversation at the campus coffee house, Summit.

Register online for this Saturday’s free unconference, and please contact Mark Sample (masample@davidson.edu) with any questions. We hope to see you there!

Horace’s Opera Omnia

Opera Omnia 1615

Opera Omnia
1615

Q. Horatii Flacci Opera Omnia.  Horace.  Basileae: Apud Ludovicum Regem, 1615.

The Rare Book Room has a number of volumes in Latin, one of which is a special gift to the library from Claire Fallon in memory of her husband Timothy, who had done a great deal of research in the library.  We miss Mr. Fallon, but are grateful to his wife for giving us one of his treasures.

The volume is a 1615 printing of the works of the Latin poet, Horace (65-8 B.C.), once the principal poet of the imperial court of Rome, and, after the death of Virgil, the national poet.

Our volume of his works, Q. Horatii Flacci Opera Omnia, was published in Basileae (Basil) in 1615.

Title Page

Title Page

It has an engraved title page, is printed in black and red, and uses vignettes and historiated letters (enlarged initial letters which contain pictures) in the text.

Example of historiated letter.

Example of historiated letter.


Our sincere thanks to Mrs. Fallon for her gift.

Campus Changes Seen Through Maps

A class visit for Digital Studies 360 (Digital Maps, Space and Place) brought a reminder that while some aspects of the campus have lasted generations, others have been more, well, let’s say mobile. In DS360 students are learning about mapping. They spent time looking at a variety of campus maps and asking questions about campus changes.

Even though there have been 2 Chambers buildings and 2 Martin Science buildings, the physical location of English classes or chemistry labs has remained within the same general area.  Not so for athletics, particularly gymnasiums.  Those have wandered all over campus.

Campus map from 1928-29

Campus map from 1928-29

This map from 1928-29 shows some of the transitions.  The dark building (#7) is noted as the Physical Training building.  Built in 1890, it provided the first indoor gymnasium for the campus. Known as Morrison Hall, it also served as the YMCA building.

Students putting on an exhibition in front of Morrison Hall.

Students putting on an exhibition in front of Morrison Hall.

Students working out on outdoor gym equipment.

Students working out on outdoor gym equipment.

Along with the building, the college constructed an outdoor gymnasium that grew more elaborate over time. Starting with parallel bars and adding layers of ladders and platforms.  By 1917, the college was in need of a new gym facility. The Alumni Gymnasium, the grey building on the map (#32), moved athletic gathering from the front of campus to behind the Chambers building.  The name Alumni Gymnasium was appropriate since alumni funded the building, raising the money by classes. The class of 1886 won the honor of raising the most money, $1725.00, followed by the class of 1875  at $1260.00.

Alumni Gymnasium

Alumni Gymnasium

The three story building was 95 feet by 90 feet, with the locker room the basement, gym space on the main floor and offices on the 3rd.  The 1929 basketball team with Dean Rusk ’31 and future history professor Frontis Johnston ’30 played in this building, although to small crowds as the space was not designed to hold many spectators

1929 team on steps of Alumni Gym

1929 team on steps of Alumni Gym

The next gym, Johnston, was built in 1949. It was built just a little to the east of the Alumni Gymnasium, facing the already existing Richardson field — and with more seating for basketball fans. The current gym is Baker Sports Complex built in 1989. Once again, it is a little further to the east and offers even more seating for Wildcat fans.

Basketball area in Alumni Gymnasium

Basketball area in Alumni Gymnasium

Johnston Gym allowed for more students and townspeople to support the Wildcats.

Johnston Gym allowed for more students and townspeople to support the Wildcats.

The map also shows tennis courts in 2 locations. The oldest location were the courts next to Concord Road,  while the newly build courts moved east as well bumping up to the golf course (which later moved further to the east as well).  The tennis courts are moving again — a bit more to the east behind the Baker Sports complex.  Looks like the archives will need to add some new maps for future students.

25th anniversary of Hurricane Hugo

In the early morning hours of September 22, 1989, Hurricane Hugo wreaked havoc around Davidson, after causing significant damage in the Caribbean and coastal South Carolina. The college community was lucky, for the most part – although the storm felled over 230 trees and damaged the roofs of four dormitories, as well as the porch of the President’s House, there were no injuries and buildings were able to be repaired. As Davidson student Jim Leach commented in the October 11, 1989 issue of The Davidsonian, “I was really happy that I have a home to go to for fall break… I feel sorry for the people in Charleston.”

Students with the Davidson College historical marker on campus, illustrating the amount of debris on September 22, 1989.

Students with the Davidson College historical marker on front campus, illustrating the amount of debris on September 22, 1989.

Downed tree

A damaged tree near Dormitory Row.

While fortunate that no lives were lost, Mecklenburg County declared a state of emergency and some homes in Davidson and the surrounding towns were without power for over a week. The cost of replacing the downed trees on campus was estimated at $400,000, and the cost alone was not the most severe blow – the October 1989 issue of Campus Chronicle quoted director of facilities planning Grover Meetze as saying, “You cannot express in tangible terms what was lost. Dollars and cents just won’t do it. Everyone had special trees around campus, and the sight of them all lying on the ground at once was powerful.”

A student relaxes, feet up against the roots of an upturned tree.

A student relaxes, feet up against the roots of an upturned tree.

Students gather near the college well.

Students gather near the college well.

student

Freshman Jay Spiegel helps clear downed trees near the main entrance to the college.

The damage from Hurricane Hugo was such that classes on the 22nd were canceled, a rare event at Davidson – as The Davidsonian commented, “Students will forever remember the unexpected holiday from classes.” Students, staff, and faculty worked together to help clear debris from campus, and the food service staff worked overtime to make sure students were fed. Then College President John Wells Kuykendall called the volunteer clean-up effort “the epitome of the Davidson spirit.”

President Kuykendall assisted with the campus clean-up all day on Friday, September 22nd, 1989.

President Kuykendall assisted with the campus clean-up all day on Friday, September 22nd, 1989.

Students

Hilary Coman, Hilary Bridgers, and Blaine John (all Class of 1992), spending their day off from classes helping clean the campus.

Students walk on the trunk of a felled tree on campus.

Students walk on the trunk of a felled tree on campus.

 

For more information on Hurricane Hugo in Davidson and beyond, read the October 11, 1989 issue of The Davidsonianthe DavidsonNews.net story on the anniversary, or the Charlotte Observer‘s 25th anniversary coverage.

 

Horses in the RBR

From the Diderot Encyclopedie

From the Diderot Encyclopedie

For years I was afraid of these large…beautiful, but large…animals.  But since my husband got me interested in watching the Kentucky Derby, the Preakness and the Belmont Stakes races a couple of years ago, and I’ve now visited some of these thoroughbreds “up close and personal” in Lexington, KY, I’ve come to appreciate their grace, beauty, and amazing talent.  Since I’m looking forward to an October trip to “horse country”, I thought I’d see how horses are portrayed in some of our RBR volumes.  Some are images; some are stories and poems.
Take a look!

England, my England, and other stories / D. H. Lawrence.  New York: T. Seltzer, 1922. 1st edition.

Table of Contents

England my England
Table of Contents

Beasts and Saints; woodcuts by Robert Gibbings.  London: Constable, 1934.  (Stories of beasts and saints from the end of the fourth to the end of the twelfth century, translated from the original Latin.)

Book of Days

Book of Days

The Book of Days of Llewelyn Powys: thoughts from his philosophy / selected by John Wallis.  With 12 etchings by Elizabeth Corsellis.  London: Golden Cockerel Press, 1937. (Limited to 300 copies printed on Batchelor hand-made paper with a special watermark designed by the artist.)

Editor’s Choice / Alfred Dashiell.  New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1934. 1st edition. (This was the first time that William Faulkner’s story, Spotted Horses, appeared in book form.)

Emblematum Libellus / Andrea Alciata.  Lvgdvni: Jacobus Modernus, 1544. (With woodcut emblems.)

Emblematum Libellus Woodcut

Emblematum Libellus
Woodcut

Romance of Tristan and Iseult

Romance of Tristan and Iseult

Romance of Tristan and Iseult.  Drawn from the best French sources and re-told by J. Bedier.  Illustrated by Robert Engles.  Translated into English by H. Belloc.  London: George Allen, 1903.  (Limited edition of 300 copies.)

The Five Nations / Rudyard Kipling.  London: Methuen, 1903.  1st edition. (Contains the short story, White Horses.)

Five Nations "The White Horses"

Five Nations
“White Horses”

Gauchos of the Pampas and their horses / W. H. Hudson and R. B. Cunninghame Graham; Foreword by J. Frank Dobie. 

In the Clearing / Robert Frost.  New York: Holt Rinehart and Winston, 1962.  (Includes the poem, The Draft Horse.)