41 Years of Women’s Varsity Sports

Since Davidson College officially went co-educational in 1972, women have been playing sports. Early sports participation by Davidson women included the formation of a co-ed intramural swim team in 1972, and Tracy Charles (Class of 1974) became the first woman to join the varsity sailing team that same year.

1974-1975 swim team.

1974-1975 co-ed swim team, from Quips and Cranks 1975.

On October 26, 1973, the College Trustees passed  their Policy Statement on Athletics and Physical Education, which included a proviso that “other intercollegiate athletic teams, including women’s teams, be supported financially at a level which would enable them to make a positive contribution to the overall athletic program,” which marked the College’s intention to comply with Title IX. 1973-1974, the first year that freshman women enrolled as degree candidates, saw the establishment of basketball and tennis as varsity sports for women. The basketball team was coached on a volunteer basis by Ann Holland, whose husband Terry coached the varsity men’s team. The tennis team was led by student player-coach Carol Goldsborough (Class of 1975). This banner year for women in Davidson sports also produced the first female varsity swimmer, Susan Reid (Class of 1977).

The 1974-1975 women's tennis team, from Quips & Cranks 1975.

The 1974-1975 women’s tennis team, from Quips & Cranks 1975.

The women's basketball team on the bench during a game in Johnston Gym, circa late 1970s.

The women’s basketball team on the bench during a game in Johnston Gym, circa late 1970s.

The first full-time paid female athletics staff member was Pat Drake, who was appointed in Fall 1974 to coach swimming and women’s tennis. Two years later, Susan Roberts was hired to coach women’s basketball and the newly established field hockey team, and during the 1977-1978 year, a playing field was set aside specifically for the field hockey team.

The Davidson field hockey team playing during its inaugural year, 1976.

The Davidson field hockey team playing during its inaugural year, 1976.

Davidson basketball player makes a jump shot, circa early 1980s.

Davidson basketball player makes a jump shot, circa early 1980s.

1977 through 1980 saw further expansion of women’s sports at Davidson: a co-ed intramural equestrian program began in 1977, women’s cross country and track intramural teams were formed in 1978 (both teams became varsity programs in 1982), and athletic facilities were improved by renovation and expansion of women’s locker rooms. Rebecca “Becca” Stimson (Class of 1977) is a standout athlete from these early years of women at Davidson – Stimson lettered in three varsity sports (four years of tennis, three of basketball, and one season of field hockey), and since 1978, the Rebecca E. Stimson Award has been presented to “a woman athlete in recognition of outstanding dedication and contribution to intercollegiate athletics” (from the College Catalog 2010-2011; see a list of the Stimson award winners here).

Davidson's Riding Club, from Quips & Cranks 1980.

Davidson’s Riding Club, from Quips & Cranks 1980.

Women’s sports at Davidson have continued to expand, adding volleyball in 1986, soccer in 1989, and lacrosse in 1994. Some notable highlights include: a 1984 women’s tennis Division III National Championship; a 1991 women’s tennis Big South Conference Championship; six consecutive Deep South Field Hockey Championships between 1991 and 1996; women’s soccer Southern Conference Championships in 1993, 1994, 1995, and 2009; a 2008 women’s swimming Coastal Collegiate Swimming Association championship. Currently,  Davidson women compete in ten varsity sports.

Darwin’s Descent of Man

Descent of Man 1st ed., 1871

Descent of Man
1st ed., 1871

The Descent of man, and selection in relation to sex.  By Charles Darwin.  London, J. Murray, 1871, 2v., 1st edition.

Published 12 years after his famous On the Origin of Species, The Descent of Man was Darwin’s second work dealing with the theory of evolution and natural selection.  His first, On the Origin of Species, may be a more familiar title to many, but it is on page 2 of the 1st edition of The Descent of Man that Darwin first used the term evolution.

Use of the word "evolution" in 1st paragraph

Use of the word “evolution” in 1st paragraph

The Rare Book Room has a copy of the 1st edition, 1st issue, which was published in 2 volumes in a run of 2500 copies on February 24, 1871.  It was given to the library by Dr. Carlton B. Chapman, Davidson class of 1936, and a collector in the area of medical history.  It is in its original green cloth binding,

Original binding

Original binding

and a bookseller’s note on the title page of volume 1 indicates that it is a “1st edition as issued.”  The volumes are illustrated throughout with wood engravings.

Engraving

Engraving

Errata sheet

Errata sheet

 

 

 

 

 

An errata sheet on the verso (back) of the title page of volume 2 lists the errors noted but un-corrected in the text, such as the word mail for male, and a scrambled spelling of walruses as narwhals.  Darwin also noted in a postscript that he made a “serious and unfortunate error, in relation to the sexual differences of animals” on pages 297-299 of volume 1, and admits that “the explanation given is wholly erroneous.”

"serious and unfortunate error"

“serious and unfortunate error”

(Even great scientists sometimes make initial errors in discovery!)

Thanks, Dr. Chapman, for this great donation to the RBR collection.

Our Mercantile Campus

An editorial writer in the 22 October 2014 Davidsonian asked “why not offer our students built-in entrepreneurship opportunities (to make REAL money)?”  The context was the re-use of the laundry building but for Around the D it brought up the history of student enterprises.

From the earliest days of the school, students found ways to bring in some income. Cornelia Shaw, in her history of the college, recounted the story of William Allison, class of 1840, who:

had a private harness shop between the Eumenean Hall and the southwest corner of campus. His father was a tanner and he did a considerable business. He sold not only enough of his product to pay his expenses, but enough to create a comfortable margin. (Davidson College, p. 39)

She also noted that other students operated blacksmith shops, cabinet and carpenter shops during the 1840s.  By the 1890s, students were moving into sales.  The April 1890 Davidson Monthly included an article “Our Mercantile Campus.”  Reporting that “not less that five clothing houses are now represented on our campus”and that being a store agent was “far from not being remunerative,” the piece went on to say, “the firms as represented have their respective headquarters at Oak Row, Elm Row, and Upper Tammany Hall, which three are centrally located and within easy reach of the passenger’s and freight depots, the Telegraph and Express-offices.”  Students visiting the dormitory rooms these agents could see examples of suits, shirts, shoes, neck bands and socks. Remember – in this era students wore suits to class- every day.

The early issues of the Davidsonian reflect more of the entrepreneurial spirit in advertisements.

A block of student business ads from the  16 September 1914

A block of student business ads from the 16 September 1914 Davidsonian

William  A. Johnson, class of 1916 was managing shoe repairs while J. R. Dunn, ’15 handled suits.  Prior to the college laundry, students, including William Sayad, ’17 an international student, worked with companies in Charlotte to insure classmates had clean clothes. For those who couldn’t afford to send a suit down the road, the pressing clubs offered spot cleaning and fine creases.

More laundry opportunities and a way to get the 1914 version of flyers printed.

More laundry opportunities and a way to get the 1914 version of flyers printed.

There have been Belks attending Davidson since 1848 and students representing the stores since 1916

There have been Belks attending Davidson since 1848 and students representing the stores on campus since at least 1916

The advent of World War I and required military training for Davidson students opened up possibilities for classmates J. A. Thames ’18 and J. T.Maddrey ’19.

John A Thames, class of 1918

John A Thames, class of 1918

In 1920, the Davidsonian reported on an essay contest sponsored by Arthur Murray who apparently earned extra money teaching dance while at student at Georgia Tech.

Article on essay contest "Five ways of Earning Money at College."  26 November 1920

Article on essay contest “Five ways of Earning Money at College.” 26 November 1920

With Davidson College’s history of boarding houses as the solution for feeding students, one on-going source of income was being a boarding house manager.  Not an easy job as this list of rules below relating to the payment of fees (and penalties for non-payment of fees) makes clear.

Boarding house rules fall of 1922

Boarding house rules fall of 1922

In 1927, faculty still expected students to show up well-dressed but didn’t allow much free time to shop in Charlotte, giving Robert McQueen a captive audience for his wares.

1927 advertisement for R. B. McQueen, sales agent for The Vogue

1927 advertisement for R. B. McQueen, sales agent for The Vogue

The college found it necessary to put some regulations on student agents in an attempt to keep study hours distraction free.  Being able to find students in their rooms was a bonus for the agents and their clients now knew when to have cash on hand.

1928 article announcing new campus rules for student acting as agents for dry cleaners and shoe repairs.

1928 article announcing new campus rules for student acting as agents for dry cleaners and shoe repairs.

At least one student became an agent for a local restaurant, helping his fellow students stave of hunger while studying in a era with no snack machines or dorm kitchens.

K. L. Hanrahan, '35 found a way to supplement his income and boarding house meals.

K. L. Hanrahan, ’35 found a way to supplement his income and boarding house meals.

For at least the first 100 years, some students at Davidson found ways of earning funds via their fellow students.  Did you have a business enterprise as a student? Or know of other student businesses?  Maybe today’s students can take inspiration from the creativity of earlier students.

October is for Archives-Lovers

October is American Archives Month (and North Carolina Archives Month), and here at Davidson’s Archives & Special Collections, we’ve had a busy few weeks of sharing stories, leading class discussions, promoting archival advocacy, and assisting users! Here’s a few highlights of what public-facing activities each member of our team did this month:

Jan Blodgett, College Archivist and Records Management Coordinator:

Promotional poster from the Charlotte Teachers Institute panel that Jan spoke at.

Promotional poster from the Charlotte Teachers Institute panel that Jan spoke at.

Sharon Byrd, Special Collections Outreach Librarian:

  • Planned Ghosts in the Library event, with assistance from Peer Research Advisors
  • Taught, led discussion, or facilitated: ART 215 Intro to Print Media (Tyler Starr), ENG 240 British Lit to 1800 (Gabriel Ford), LAT 202 Int. Latin (Britta Ager), AFR 101 Africana Studies  (Tracy Hucks)
  • Helped lead an archival donor visit (with Caitlin)
The display Sharon and I set up for a donor visit - we pulled collections and objects to highlight the donors' father (an alumnus), as well as the athletic history of Davidson.

The display Sharon and I set up for a donor visit – we pulled collections and objects to highlight the donors’ father (an alumnus), as well as the athletic history of Davidson.

Caitlin Christian-Lamb, Associate Archivist (me!):

  • Helped lead an archival donor visit (with Sharon)
  • Gave a campus historical tour and set up archival exhibition for Pi Kappa Phi alumni reunion (1962 – 1969 classes)
  • Spoke on a Society of North Carolina Archivists‘ panel for current University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill SILS students
  • Taught three sessions of  DIG 350 History & Future of the Book (Mark Sample), and one session of HIS  382 Science and the Body in East Asia (Saeyoung Park)
  • Helped facilitate and attended THATCamp Piedmont (see the schedule and collaborative Google docs here) after a few months of serving on the planning committee
  • Met with students for MAT 110 Finite Mathematics class about archives data visualization projects (with Jan)
  • Gave a short presentation on digital archival resources at the monthly education and technology gathering on campus (GitPub)
Pi Kappa Phi Epsilon chapter alumni (class of 1962-69) listen to an overview of what's changed on front campus in the last 50 years.

Pi Kappa Phi Epsilon chapter alumni (classes of 1962-69) listen to an overview of what’s changed on front campus in the last 50 years.

We also have a few more upcoming public events. Tonight all three members of Archives & Special Collections will be at Ghosts in the Library – come to the Smith Rare Book Room on the second floor of the library at 8:00 PM to hear scary stories and eat delicious treats. Tomorrow (October 30th), Jan and I will be participating in #AskAnArchivist Day, a national archival outreach initiative – simply tweet a question and #AskAnArchivist to @DavidsonArchive, and we’ll tell you everything we know! Early next month, on November 8th, the first ever Piedmont Triad Home Movie Day/ Personal Digital Archiving Day will be held at Wake Forest University’s library – HMD/PDAD is co-hosted and co-planned by the archives and library staff of Davidson College and Wake Forest University. Come watch college archival footage, share your own home movies, and learn basic digital preservation tips!

6th Annual “Ghosts in the Library”

Next Wednesday, October 29th at 8:00 we are celebrating Halloween with our 6th Annual “Ghosts in the Library” event in the Rare Book Room of the E.H. Little Library.  We’ll have Davidsonians telling their favorite ghost stories.  You may not have seen the Rare Book Room in quite this way…with “ghoulies and ghosties and long-leggedy beasties, and things that go bump in the night.”

No tricks.  Just scary stories, and treat bags for all who come.

And, the winner of our “Ghostly Images” photo contest will be announced that night as well.

Hope to see you there!

BOO!